A Companion to Dental Anthropology by Joel D. Irish, G. Richard Scott

By Joel D. Irish, G. Richard Scott

Companion to Dental Anthropology provides a suite of unique readings addressing all features and sub-disciplines of the sphere of dental anthropology—from its origins and evolution via to the newest medical research.

  • Represents the main complete assurance of all sub-disciplines of dental anthropology to be had today
  • Features person chapters written by way of  specialists of their particular zone of dental research
  • Includes authors who additionally current effects from their study via case experiences or voiced reviews approximately their work
  • Offers vast assurance of issues when it comes to dental evolution, morphometric version, and pathology

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A Companion to Dental Anthropology

Spouse to Dental Anthropology offers a suite of unique readings addressing all elements and sub-disciplines of the sphere of dental anthropology—from its origins and evolution via to the newest clinical learn. Represents the main complete assurance of all sub-disciplines of dental anthropology on hand at the present time gains person chapters written via  specialists of their particular sector of dental study comprises authors who additionally current effects from their learn via case stories or voiced reviews approximately their paintings bargains broad assurance of themes with regards to dental evolution, morphometric edition, and pathology

Extra resources for A Companion to Dental Anthropology

Sample text

Diphyodonty and the Cessation of Growth of the Dentary Diphyodonty, the reduction of tooth generations to no more than two, is another trait sometimes used to define mammals. It is associated with the cessation of jaw growth in adulthood (non‐mammalian gnathostomes have indeterminate growth, and their jaws get progressively longer throughout life) and with the need for precise occlusion d­uring mastication. In most vertebrates, smaller teeth are replaced by larger ones over and over 28 peter s.

All of this happened well before the first mammal connected squamosal to dentary bone (see later). Hardened Tooth Caps Known acanthodians did not have hardened caps covering their tooth crowns. Maybe, then, early gnathostomes figured out how to make teeth before they learned how to strengthen them. Vertebrates today commonly cover their crowns with a highly m­ineralized tissue, enameloid for most fishes, and enamel for most amphibians, r­eptiles, and mammals. Enameloid develops from both odontoblast (neural crest–derived) cells and ameloblast (ectoderm‐derived) cells, whereas enamel forms from ameloblasts only (see Sander 2000; Line and Novaes 2005; Chapter 16).

1 Cusp names and locations according to the Cope–Osborn model, as illustrated in: (a) human upper right first molar, and (b) human lower right first molar. Numbers denote original hypothesized order in which the cusps were thought to have evolved (though in two cases these have been shown to be incorrect). See text for details. For orientation purposes, the top of the image is the mesial direction, bottom is distal, outer edges buccal, and center lingual. Figure by Joel Irish. cusp that Osborn called the protocone is actually the paracone of today’s trigon.

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